Ark of the Liberties

Ark of the Liberties

America and the World

Book - 2008
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Baker & Taylor
A former speechwriter for Bill Clinton and frequent reviewer for the New York Times Book Review recounts America's long-standing advocacy of democracy throughout the world, its dramatic fall from international popularity throughout the past eight years, and the positive contributions of past presidents.

McMillan Palgrave
The United States stands at a historic crossroads; essential to the world yet unappreciated. America’s decline in popularity over the last eight years has been nothing short of astonishing. With wit, brilliance, and deep affection, Ted Widmer, a scholar and a former presidential speechwriter, reminds everyone why this great nation had so far to fall. In a sweeping history of centuries, Ark of the Liberties recounts America’s ambition to be the world’s guarantor of liberty. It is a success story that America, and the world, forgets at its peril.
From the Declaration of Independence to the Gettysburg Address to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the United States, for all its shortfalls, has been by far the world’s greatest advocate for freedom. Generations of founders imbued America with a surprisingly global ambition that a series of remarkable presidents, often Democratic, advanced through the confident wielding of military and economic power. Ark of the Liberties brims with new insights: America’s centuries-long favorable relationship with the Middle East; why Wilson’s presidency deserves reappraisal; Bill Clinton’s underappreciated achievements; how America’s long history of foreign policy immediately touches on the choices we face in 2008. Fully addressing America’s disastrous occupation of Iraq, Ark of the Liberties colorfully narrates America’s long and laudatory history of expanding world liberty.


Holtzbrinck
Why the World Loves/Hates America
 
Long before there was an America, Europeans sensed that a land of freedom lay to the west, by definition different from the cloistered Old World. A fantasy grew into a society, then a nation, and finally a superpower; yet the belief always lingered that liberty and America were one and the same. Often they were. But unattainable aspirations can be as damaging as they are uplifting. From the Puritans to Thomas Paine, from Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush, Americans have believed we have nothing less than a mission to redeem the world. Pursuing that belief, we have stumbled into a paradox: the desire to see liberty spread around the globe leads to forced efforts that are inconsistent with a true definition of liberty. 
 
With wit, brilliance, and deep affection, the inimitable Ted Widmer has written a history of America in the world unlike any other. Ranging from the late seventeenth century to the present, Widmer traces America’s wondrous history, the arc that runs from the Declaration of Independence to the Gettysburg Address to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. He also looks unblinkingly at our less glorious history, from the 1739 Stono Rebellion, which saw slaves massacred under a banner declaring “liberty,” to the occupation of Iraq and America’s dismal standing in world opinion. Ark of the Liberties is that luminous rarity, a celebratory critique written in the conviction that if Americans want an occasionally ungrateful world to respect us more, then it will certainly help to know ourselves a little better.


Baker
& Taylor

Recounts America's long-standing advocacy of democracy throughout the world, its dramatic fall from international popularity throughout the past eight years, and the positive contributions of past presidents.
The collapse of America's standing in world opinion over the past eight years has been catastrophic. Ted Widmer, scholar and former speechwriter for President Clinton, reminds us why America had so far to fall. In a sweeping history of centuries, he recounts America's ambition to be the world's guarantor of liberty--a success story that America, and the world, forgets at its peril. Fully addressing America's disastrous occupation of Iraq, this book colorfully narrates America's long, complex history of expanding world liberty. The founding generation imbued America with an ambition that a series of remarkable presidents, primarily Wilson to FDR to Clinton, wielded American power to advance. The book brims with insights: America's centuries-long favorablerelationship with the Middle East; why Wilson's presidency deserves reappraisal; Bill Clinton's underappreciated achievements; and how America's long history of foreign policy immediately touches on the choices we face in 2008.--From publisher description.

Publisher: New York : Hill and Wang, 2008
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780809027354
0809027356
Branch Call Number: E183 .W545 2008
Characteristics: xxii, 355 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm

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